The Genetic Rescue Foundation Blog

The little bush moa genome

Scientists at Harvard University have assembled the first nearly complete genome of the little bush moa, a flightless bird that went extinct soon after Polynesians settled New Zealand in the late 13th century. The achievement moves the field… Read More

Fossil poop reveals critical role of giant birds in New Zealand’s ecosystem

When the first humans landed on what is now known as New Zealand 700 years ago, they didn’t find mammals. Instead, they discovered giant birds called moas, as well as a host of other indigenous bird species. Soon, they… Read More

What a moa wants

As the dust has settled on another New Zealand election and policy promises turn into policy implementation, it seemed worthwhile to reflect on what a fully restored ecosystem would look like in 21st century Aotearoa/NZ and how this… Read More

Manipulating the avian egg: applications for embryo transfer, transgenics, and cloning

In vitro production of germline chimeras and avian cloning may utilise the transfer of avian embryos from their original eggshell to a surrogate eggshell for culture during incubation. Such embryo transfer is valuable for avian cloning as the… Read More

De-extinction: more hype than hope – A rebuttal

Helen Taylor a genetics researcher at the University of Otago recently published this blog post that attempts to discredit The Genetic Rescue Foundation’s objectives. http://sciblogs.co.nz/wild-science/2017/03/08/de-extinction-hype/ The following is The Genetic Rescue Foundation’s response to this piece. I believe in… Read More

Contractors unearth giant moa bones in rural South Canterbury

Contractors discovered dozens of bones from what may be the tallest bird species recorded in what has been called an increasingly rare find. The bones of a female South Island giant moa were found with at least one… Read More

Bringing Back the Moa?

In The Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin asserts that “species and groups of species gradually disappear one after another, first from one spot, then from another, and finally from the world.” From the Darwinian perspective, species adaptation… Read More