The Genetic Rescue Foundation Blog

Biological annihilation via the ongoing sixth mass extinction signaled by vertebrate population losses and declines

The population extinction pulse we describe here shows, from a quantitative viewpoint, that Earth’s sixth mass extinction is more severe than perceived when looking exclusively at species extinctions. Therefore, humanity needs to address anthropogenic population extirpation and decimation… Read More

The little bush moa genome

Scientists at Harvard University have assembled the first nearly complete genome of the little bush moa, a flightless bird that went extinct soon after Polynesians settled New Zealand in the late 13th century. The achievement moves the field… Read More

New Zealand’s two new (but long-lost) flightless birds

A goldmine of New Zealand’s prehistoric natural history has just yielded two more long-lost native species – tiny flightless rails. Scientists discovered fossil bones of what have just been described as two new species of rail near St… Read More

Fossil poop reveals critical role of giant birds in New Zealand’s ecosystem

When the first humans landed on what is now known as New Zealand 700 years ago, they didn’t find mammals. Instead, they discovered giant birds called moas, as well as a host of other indigenous bird species. Soon, they… Read More

Overseas researchers interested in pest control or eradication are all looking at New Zealand

“Overseas researchers interested in pest control or eradication are all looking at New Zealand,” says Forest and Bird chief executive Kevin Hague. There are several reasons for that. We are distant from other land masses, and we are… Read More

What a moa wants

As the dust has settled on another New Zealand election and policy promises turn into policy implementation, it seemed worthwhile to reflect on what a fully restored ecosystem would look like in 21st century Aotearoa/NZ and how this… Read More

The hidden crisis shaping life on earth

The diversity of species on Earth is plummeting, and by 2100, the number of extinctions could be as high as 1,000 – what can we do about it? Read the full article